What’s in a Name: Puffin Puffinus

By Adrian Binns | July 5, 2020

July 3rd was World Seabird Day, and Chris Brown posted a great blog Every Auk has its Day  commemorating this important date. In honor of these fascinating birds, and the plights they face around the world, I’d like to share a bit about puffins, one of my favorite seabirds. Puffins are always a crowd-pleaser – with…

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Every Auk Has Its Day

By Chris Brown | July 3, 2020

“Prophet-like, that lone one stood.” – From the account of the capture of the last Great Auk ever seen in the British Isles, June 1840. Everything has a day, it seems. National Static Electricity Day, Ice Cream for Breakfast Day, which is followed about a week later by National Toothache Day. Timely enough. World Quark…

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My Piece of Paradise: Trinidad & Tobago

By Sal Ingraham | July 1, 2020

Written by Roger Neckles   Trinidad and Tobago (T&T) is a blessed Caribbean twin island state, situated a mere 6.8 miles off the North East Coast of Venezuela, our closest neighbours. Trinidad measures 1,841 sq mi in area with an average length of 50 mi and an average width of 37 mi. Tobago is approximately…

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Endemics of the United States Lower 48

By Adrian Binns | June 28, 2020

An endemic species is one that is only found within specifically-defined boundaries, ecological areas, or habitats.  Endemics can be identified in large or small areas – continents or countries, mountain ranges or islands. In the United States, the continental Lower 48 states encompass ~3 million square miles, and host 15 fully endemic bird species out…

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What’s in a Name: A Perfect Pair

By Adrian Binns | June 26, 2020

In nomenclature of United States birds, there are two husband-wife couples for whom bird species are named. Read on to see who they are. Charles Lucien Bonaparte, Napoleon’s nephew, was a 19th century ornithologist who was widely considered to be the father of American systematic ornithology. Bonaparte’s Gull Chroicocephalus philadelphia bears his name. Bonaparte honored his…

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World Rainforest Day 2020

By Sal Ingraham | June 24, 2020

The “lungs of the earth” circle the globe, forming a green belt at the equator. Tropical rainforests in Central and South America, Africa, Southern Asia, and Australia cover about 6% of the planet. This may not seem like much. Yet within these incredible forests live over half the species of plants and animals found in…

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GREAT GRAY OWL FLEDGLINGS

By Alex Lamoreaux | June 22, 2020

Vast Ponderosa Pine forest broken up by wildflower-filled meadows cover the Cascades of southern Oregon and provides refuge to one of the densest populations of Great Gray Owls in the United States. In fact 10 different owl species can be found in the region, and that’s the reason we now offer a 4-day target tour…

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World Albatross Day 2020

By Alex Lamoreaux | June 19, 2020

A boat trip on the open ocean is like visiting a new world. Deep blue water surrounds you as far as the eye can see. Invisible to us, but filling the water below, are thousands of fish and other marine life. The huge, smooth back of a whale breaks the surface of the choppy sea.…

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Woodcock Wander

By Adrian Binns | June 17, 2020

I have a great affinity for birds that can blend easily into their environments. Owls and nightjars come to mind, perfectly-camouflaged against bark or on the ground. Their cryptic colouration and patterns blend in so well that we often walk past them without realizing they are there. Shorebirds especially in breeding plumage and on the…

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IN THE BACKYARD: Philadelphia early-June

By Adrian Binns | June 15, 2020

June is the month for breeding bird activity, and my backyard hosts a number of expected species. However, the first day of the month I recorded a singing male Blackburnian Warbler, one of the last migrants to move through the region. A lone Red-eyed Vireo sang a few days, but perhaps failed to attract a…

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SPECIES SPOTLIGHT: GAMBEL’S QUAIL

By Sal Ingraham | June 12, 2020

One perk of being “stuck” at home for the last few months is that I’ve gotten a chance to really get to know the Gambel’s Quail that live in the yard. A Sonoran desert specialist, these quail are usually found near desert streams and watering holes. However, they have adapted well to suburban areas too.…

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SPECIES SPOTLIGHT: RIDGWAY’S RAIL

By Alex Lamoreaux | June 8, 2020

The name Ridgway’s Rail may be unfamiliar to many birders because it is the result of 2014’s three-way split of Clapper Rail, the same year when a split of King Rail also occurred. Most field guides haven’t been updated recently enough to show this new species listed! In 2014 Clapper Rail became 3 species; with…

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